The International Journal of Wilderness (IJW) is the tool of choice for wilderness managers and advocates, produced through a unique collaboration between the WILD Foundation and its many partners and sponsors.

Featured Articles

Reaching Nature “Through the Noise”

Reaching Nature “Through the Noise”

Wilderness and wildlands are often epitomized by their opportunities for solitude. Their remoteness gives humans the opportunity to take time away from society and find respite, recovery, and rejuvenation.

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Wildland Advocates in Unexpected Places

Wildland Advocates in Unexpected Places

The concepts of “shared stewardship” or “collaborative management” can be challenging. They require shared vision, definition of clear roles and responsibilities, and commitment to the collaborative process.

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Wilderness Babel

Wilderness Babel

Brazil’s long-distance trails (LDT) are the descendants of historical routes of travel for indigenous peoples that date back thousands of years.

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We invite contributions pertinent to wilderness worldwide, including issues about stewardship, planning, management, education, research, international perspectives, and inspirational articles. The IJW solicits original manuscripts only and (with rare but important professional exception) we do not accept those previously published or simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Archived Issues

To expand your wilderness knowledge and target your action to protect wilderness, take advantage of the most extensive wilderness publications archive in the world, with free access to IJW issues that started in 1995!

December 2021

December 2021

In this issue of IJW, we remember George Stankey and his contributions to wilderness research and stewardship. Mark Anderson provides a synthesis of recent findings on carbon storage in old growth forests. Rosemary Evans examines prescribed burning in Britain’s moorlands. And Tobias Nickel presents a call for a standard definition of “Natural” in wilderness stewardship.

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August 2021

August 2021

In this issue, Roger Kaye discusses preserving wildness in the Anthropocene. Chris Armatas and others explore shared stewardship and partnerships through empathy. Howard Smith, Richard Discenza, and Robert Dvorak present a pandemic inspired research agenda. And Vladimir Bocharnikov and Evsey Kosman consider indicators for regional policy making in Russia.

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April 2021

April 2021

In this issue of IJW, Larry Beck and Dan Dustin interpret the evolution of John Muir’s legacy. Michelle Reilly examines the significant contributions of women to the wilderness preservation movement. Martha Bierut, Rebecca Niemiec, Randy Welsh, and Dave Cantrell analyze practices that enhance volunteer retention. And Amy Lewis discusses learning faster and better through global mentorship.

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Book Review

Book Review

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. by Robin Wall Kimmerer

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December 2020

December 2020

In this issue of IJW, we remember Michael Soulé and his contributions to conservation. Karen Mudar examines managing cultural resources in wilderness. Tyler Cribbs, Ryan Sharp, Matthew Brownlee, Elizabeth Perry, and Jessica Fefer investigate solitude for wilderness and nonwilderness users. And Grant Dixon discusses the implications of tourism on the Tasmanian Highlands.

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August 2020

August 2020

This issue is a special edition focused on long distance trails that was developed by our guest editors Jennifer Thomsen, Nathan Reigner, and Jeremy Wimpey. Read on for topics around benefits of a shared vision and stewardship for National Scenic Trails (NSTs) and wilderness areas, findings from a culturally significant trail through the Katmai Wilderness, findings for how emerging technologies create opportunities and challenges for managers and recreationists of the Appalachian Trail, and more!

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